Tag Archives: Water

Can chickens swim?

This is a pretty funny question, but I really want to know and I’m sure you do too, don’t you? Let’s check it out: Although they do not particularly like water, chickens (I refer to adult chickens only; baby chicks can drown very easily) are able to float like ducks and instinctively know how to swim. When a chicken gets in water, accidentally or otherwise, it will instinctively move its legs rapidly in circular cyclic movements and try to swim ashore as quickly as it can. On […]

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What are the winter chicken care mistakes I should avoid?

Well, these are some DON’Ts of winter chicken care:  Don’t keep waterers in the coop overnight. It causes moisture and dampness. Moisture inside a cold coop causes frostbite. Moreover, chickens will only be sleeping at night, there is no need to put water in the coop overnight. Moving the feeders and waterers outside of the coop will help encourage your chickens to come outside during the day. Getting outside and getting exercise and fresh air is important for your chickens. Don’t let your water freeze. Making sure […]

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How to keep my chickens cool in summer heat?

According to the University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, an adult chicken’s normal body temperature is between 105°F and 107°F (40.6°C and 41.7°C), depending on the time of day (before and after feeding, night time). The body temperature of a newly hatched chick is about 103.5°F (39.7°C), and increases daily until it reaches a stable level at about 3 weeks of age. The ideal environmental temperature for chicks is 95°F (35°C) to 100°F (37°C), and when they get older it’s 65°F (18°C) to 70°F […]

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Why your hens stop laying eggs and what you can do about it?

Here is a list of most common reasons why your chickens have stopped laying, along with suggestions for what you can do to get them laying again:   Not Enough Daylight Hens need 14 or more hours of daylight each day to lay well. During late fall and winter, particularly from October through February (in the US), the natural daylight can drop to less than 9 hours a day; your hens would need 5 more hours of daylight to lay eggs. The solution to this is to […]

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