Tag Archives: Supplemental lighting

What are the causes of feather pecking and what can I do to stop feather pecking and cannibalism in my flock?

Severe feather pecking can lead to skin and tissue damage, and cannibalism. No one knows exactly what causes feather pecking and cannibalism, but most likely causes are: Stress Boredom Overcrowding Overheating Excessive light Nutrient deficiencies Insufficient feed or water Inadequate nest boxes Adding birds to your existing flock Failure to remove injured or dead birds in the flock in a timely manner Sometimes you have a chicken who is a bully to everyone Abrupt changes in care management practices or the environment Genetically fast-feathering and slow-feathering chickens […]

More info

How to get my chickens to lay more eggs in the winter?

Two ways to increase egg production in the winter: Forced molting — (Note: I don’t recommend this, but felt it needed to be mentioned anyway.) Molting is a bit of an issue for commercial poultry operations, as it’s really not profitable to have non–laying birds sitting around for a portion of the year. Industrial flocksters have come up with ways to control or force a molt by withholding feed or feeding drugs or hormones. Increased lighting — Although still an artificial method, providing supplemental lighting in the […]

More info

How many eggs does a chicken lay in a day?

While most hens are known to lay one egg per day from spring to late autumn/early winter; the number of eggs can also depend on breed, age of the hen, whether or not you have lighting in your hen house, quality of life and environment. It takes 26 hours for a hen to make an egg. In the Doomsday Bunker Book: Your Complete Guide to Designing, Surviving and Living in a Concrete Bunker, author Ben Jakob explains that if you’ve got young healthy hens (between 6 months […]

More info

Supplemental coop lighting — red or white light?

There are two schools of thought on this. One believes that red light doesn’t simulate sunlight like white light, so adding a red bulb to your hen house will not work for increased egg production. Another school believes in using red light because red light is more soothing (or less overstimulating) for chickens. Research cited by Animalens Inc. shows that chickens wearing red-tinted contact lenses behave differently from chickens that don’t. They eat less, produce more eggs and don’t fight as much. There are also several studies, […]

More info

What are the dos and don’ts of supplemental lighting in the chicken coop?

Dos Make sure that your pullets are at least 20 weeks of age before introducing any artificial lighting in the coop. Why 20 weeks of age? Because 20 weeks of age is the normal age for chickens to start laying. Use an automatic timer so you can ‘set it and forget it’, and to establish consistency with your lighting efforts. It’s recommended to have the timer turn the light on early in the morning until sunrise. For example, if the goal is to provide 15 hours of […]

More info