Tag Archives: Rooster

How does the rooster fertilize the egg if there is a shell on it?

When a rooster mates with the hens, his sperm make their way to the hens’ oviducts. The eggs are fertilized by the sperm in the oviducts before albumen and shells are formed. Thus, you get fertilized eggs. Broody hens will lay a clutch of a dozen fertile eggs or more during a two-week period, laying one egg per day, and then starts incubating them for about 21 days for these little bundles of joy to hatch! Watch these amazing chicken egg hatching video clips:  

More info

Why does a rooster crow in the morning?

Roosters don’t just crow to mark the start of the day, they can often be heard crowing at any time of day. Ultimately, roosters crow in order to attract hens and to tell other roosters that: “This is my territory, stay out!” They also crow when they hear the sound of another rooster, either on the same farm or one nearby. When one of his hens lays an egg, the rooster might crow to brag when he had conquered a hen. Depending on how much activity surrounds […]

More info

Can hens choose which rooster fertilizes their eggs?

Hens have their own natural ‘morning after pill’ option. Hens mate with many different roosters. If she decides after mating that she doesn’t want a particular rooster’s offspring (usually when he’s lower in the pecking order), she can eject sperm of that specific rooster before fertilization occurs, as has been experimentally shown by numerous researchers (Pizzari and Birkhead, 2000; Dean et al., 2011).  

More info

How long does a hen stay fertile after the rooster is gone?

If the rooster in a flock dies, or is removed, the hen will continue to produce fertile eggs for up to 4 weeks, depending on the breed. This is because there are sperm storage tubules (SSTs or often described ‘sperm nests’) in the oviduct of the hen that collect and store sperm for later fertilization of eggs. These SSTs provide a specific micro–environment to sustain sperm survival and fertilizing potential even after the male is not available.

More info

Do chickens have sex to lay eggs? How do chickens mate?

Chickens actually have sex or mate just like other animals do, but not necessarily to lay eggs. This is because once a hen reaches maturity at about 6 months of age, lighting conditions trigger hormones to start the egg laying cycle. She can lay eggs without mating with a male. Egg laying is spurred by hormones, hormones are triggered by environmental factors. If you remove the environmental triggers, you can stop the egg laying. If you hope to add more chicks to your flock, however, you will […]

More info

What are the pros and cons of having a rooster?

Pros They protect the flock. Roosters protect their hens from predators, sounding the alarm when threats appear and defend their own distinct territories. They complete the natural order of the flock. In the words of White Oak Pastures: “Roosters allow a more natural pecking order to develop within the flock. A flock with a rooster has a designated alpha. A flock comprised of only hens, however, will see birds jostling for the alpha position and this causes more discontent amongst the layers. Our hens will also feel […]

More info

Do you need a rooster for a hen to lay eggs?

A hen lays eggs irrespective of the presence of a rooster. A rooster is only necessary if you desire fertilized eggs to raise more chickens. In the egg industry, male chicks are culled shortly after birth as there is little to no use for the males. Many people believe that these male chicks go on to the meat industry where they will be raised for food. This is not the case. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), an American animal rights organization based in Norfolk, Virginia, estimates […]

More info

How can I distinguish a hen and a roo?

Check out the eXtension’s how to distinguish male and female chickens. As a chicken owner of more than 10 years Rachel Evans (from Quora) gives us a quick rundown of the differences between the two: Roosters: Bigger combs and wattles (the fleshy red bits on the face) Pointier neck and “saddle” feathers Longer tails, often with curved feathers Taller and heavier More upright posture, with bigger spurs Crowing usually means a rooster Hens: Smaller combs and wattles Shorter, rounded neck and saddle feathers Shorter tails Smaller More […]

More info