Tag Archives: Predators

How to keep my chickens from flying over the fence?

Wing Clipping Many backyard chicken keepers clip their chooks’ wings in order to prevent them from flying away. It’s best to clip only one to throw them off balance. For some they can still fly pretty well even with their wings clipped. The next step is to cover your pen.   Higher Fences Putting some wire fencing or mesh on top of your existing fences should keep your flock from being able to high jump over.   Chicken Coop Run Enclosure Getting a run for your chicken coop […]

More info

If chickens are so bad at flying, why do they have wings?

There are many fossil evidence supporting the theory that all modern-day birds, including chickens, are descended from dinosaurs, and may even be the closest living relative to the T-rex. Protein resembling that found in chicken has been extracted from a 68-million-year-old T-rex bone, providing further evidence of the evolutionary link between dinosaurs and chickens. The fossils of the Gobi Desert have also provided critical supportive information linking dinosaurs and their direct descendants, the birds. Over time, these ‘chickenosaurus’ had to adapt to their changing environments and resulted […]

More info

How to predator-proof my chicken coop and run?

Protecting your chickens from predators is often a constant battle for chicken keepers. Predators are active both during the day and night, all year long. In the fall, predators get even more aggressive and taking preventative measures is critical. You’ve heard the saying, “The best offense is a good defense” definitely applies to protecting your chickens from predators. Measures you can take to keep your flock safe:   Build a sturdy coop Of course, a sturdy coop isn’t foolproof, but it’s like a Berlin Wall between your […]

More info

Why your hens stop laying eggs and what you can do about it?

Here is a list of most common reasons why your chickens have stopped laying, along with suggestions for what you can do to get them laying again:   Not Enough Daylight Hens need 14 or more hours of daylight each day to lay well. During late fall and winter, particularly from October through February (in the US), the natural daylight can drop to less than 9 hours a day; your hens would need 5 more hours of daylight to lay eggs. The solution to this is to […]

More info