Tag Archives: Chicks

Can chickens recognize your face?

Recent science tell us that chickens have great memories and facial recognition skills. They are able to remember and recognize more than 100 different members of its own species, including other animals, humans, places and things, even after months apart. That means that your chickens can recognize you. So, treat them nice, people! Chickens also have the ability to learn and retain what they’ve learned from past experiences, then recall and apply in future situations. In one study, hens learned that red-colored food was good, while their […]

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Can chickens swim?

This is a pretty funny question, but I really want to know and I’m sure you do too, don’t you? Let’s check it out: Although they do not particularly like water, chickens (I refer to adult chickens only; baby chicks can drown very easily) are able to float like ducks and instinctively know how to swim. When a chicken gets in water, accidentally or otherwise, it will instinctively move its legs rapidly in circular cyclic movements and try to swim ashore as quickly as it can. On […]

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When to move chicks from the brooder to the coop?

It will depend on the time of year you hatch and what the weather is like in your area. Often, winter or early spring chicks require longer brooder warmth than late spring or summer chicks, but the most basic rule of thumb is that your chicks need to be fully feathered (generally at 6 weeks of age) before you put them outside full time without supplemental heat. Use the below chicken heat table to determine if your chicks still need supplemental heat. Chick Brooding Temperature Schedule Chick […]

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What are the pros and cons of hatching chicks with an incubator vs. a broody hen?

  HATCHING WITH AN INCUBATOR HATCHING WITH A BROODY HEN PROS PROS Depending on the size of your incubator, you can hatch many more eggs at one time than the dozen or so able to fit under a broody hen. Hen controls heat and humidity as well as turning of eggs. You can hatch whenever you want — no waiting on a hen to go broody. Satisfies a hen that wants to be a mommy. Your eggs (and little newly-hatched chicks) are safe from predators and other […]

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Why didn’t my eggs hatch?

Generally, chicken eggs hatch after approximately 21 days of incubation at optimal temperature. If your eggs have not hatched by Day 24, it is safe to assume they will never hatch. There are several common causes why the eggs fail to hatch: Egg quality Remember that a healthy egg can only come from healthy, nourished breeding pairs (of course, you’ll need a rooster to get fertile eggs). What you feed your chickens impacts the eggs they produce. The quality of life you give them is also important. […]

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What are the things that MUST be in place BEFORE my chicks arrive?

Here are the 8 most important things you must prepare BEFORE your chicks arrive:  A container to hold the chicks in This can be a fish tank, a galvanized metal tank, a kiddie/paddling pool, a premade brooder, a rabbit hutch, a Sterilite container, or a cardboard box. No matter which brooder you choose, make sure it is cleaned and sterilized, has adequate space for the chicks to move away from the heat if they get too warm, and make sure that there are no cracks or broken […]

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What is the difference between free–range and battery chickens?

Free–range chickens have access to an outdoor area during the day. At night, free–range chickens are kept in sheds or barns. Conditions on free–range farms vary greatly. On some farms, the range area is large, provides grass for foraging, has access to shade and shelter, and all birds are able to come and go from the range during the day. Unfortunately, not all free–range chickens are kept in good conditions as well. Whilst battery farm chickens, sometimes called caged chickens, are tightly packed in with very little […]

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What are the pros and cons of having a rooster?

Pros They protect the flock. Roosters protect their hens from predators, sounding the alarm when threats appear and defend their own distinct territories. They complete the natural order of the flock. In the words of White Oak Pastures: “Roosters allow a more natural pecking order to develop within the flock. A flock with a rooster has a designated alpha. A flock comprised of only hens, however, will see birds jostling for the alpha position and this causes more discontent amongst the layers. Our hens will also feel […]

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Grit and oyster shell — why your chickens need them?

Chickens don’t have teeth, which means they can’t chew — at least not in their mouths. So chickens need grit to be their teeth, which are stored in their gizzard. The gizzard is a tough and powerful muscle, and as it squeezes and churns, it uses the stones to grind up the food. Without grit, digestion is slowed and the hens are less efficient at extracting nutrients from feed, and your flock’s health can be seriously compromised. If you allow your chickens to truly free–range, they should […]

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How to tell if a baby chick is female or male?

It is fairly easy to differentiate between male and female chickens when they are adults, but not chicks. Baby chicks are pretty much small, cute, fluffy, soft, and indistinguishable, with their boy and girl parts mostly inside their bodies and are thus not visible until they’re four to six weeks old. There are three chick sexing techniques that can help determine the sex of a newly hatched chick:   Vent sexing Vent sexing is the most accurate method. This sexing method involves squeezing the feces out of […]

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